Alcoholism Addiction Treatment

For some, one drink during happy hour is plenty. These adults can take a sip of alcohol, and then stop drinking for the day. But there are some people who just can’t stop with a sip. These people might have an alcohol use disorder.


The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) says that about 7 percent of American adults fall into this category.

For some, one drink during happy hour is plenty. These adults can take a sip of alcohol, and then stop drinking for the day. But there are some people who just can’t stop with a sip. These people might have an alcohol use disorder.

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) says that about 7 percent of American adults fall into this category


“When alcohol becomes an obsession, it can be hard to focus on life’s daily pleasures. But with the help of a treatment program and ongoing support, even deep-set cases of alcoholism can be addressed, amended, and resolved."


Seeing the Signs of Alcohol Abuse

In most parts of the world, alcohol is legal for adults to both purchase and consume. As a result, beverages that contain alcohol are available almost everywhere, and clearly, many adults partake. Since use is so common, it might seem hard to determine who is drinking alcohol in an appropriate manner and who is drinking in a manner that could lead to alcohol abuse or alcoholism. Experts suggest there are key signs to look for.


Binge drinking is one such sign. This type of drinking, as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, involves consuming alcohol with the intention of getting drunk. For men, that means drinking five or more drinks in about two hours; for women, that involves consuming four or more drinks within two hours.


Harmful Drinking Games - This type of alcohol abuse pattern is easy to spot. These are people who sit down and attempt to down a great deal of alcohol at the same time. There’s intent to this drinking that is hard to hide.
These are all very different drinking patterns, but they have one thing in common. People who drink like this have lost some modicum of control over their consumption. The beverages drive their behaviours. It can seem like a subtle distinction, but it’s an important one to understand, as people who don’t amend troublesome drinking behaviours can become people who have symptoms of alcoholism.
Difficult drinking patterns can shift electrical activities within the brain, and when that happens, people might have little to no control over how they drink or when they drink.
When the use moves from troublesome to compulsive, an addiction may be in play.
But this isn’t the only type of alcohol abuse out there. People may also abuse alcohol if they:
  • Take in alcoholic beverages and driv
  • Drink alcohol throughout the day
  • Consume alcohol in order to feel a buzz, without drinking in a binging manner
  • Feel the need to drink every single day
  • Drink a large amount of alcohol in social situations

What are the Causes

It’s rare for people with alcoholism to strive for that diagnosis. No one grows up wanting to struggle with alcohol for the rest of life. But alcoholism can be sneaky, creeping into life in ways that are subtle and that can pass by unnoticed. For some, alcoholism begins with peer pressure. These people just don’t intend to start drinking, and they may not begin life even enjoying alcohol, but their peers prompt and poke them to drink alcohol. In time, as they comply with these requests from peers, they lose the ability to control how and when they drink.


For others, alcoholism comes about due to the influence of a mental illness. People like this might start using alcohol as a DIY remedy for a mental health concern like depression or anxiety. In the beginning, the drinks may seem to keep the symptoms of illness under control. But in time, the alcohol can augment the power of these illnesses.


When to Seek Help


A key symptom of alcoholism is an inability to curb or amend drinking behaviours. That means people with alcoholism may want to change, but they may feel as though they’re simply unable to do so. Sometimes, they may feel as though they’ll just never get sober, because it’s not possible for them.
An intervention is an excellent approach for people like this. The idea is to help the person to see the alcoholism as a problem and to help motivate that person to get help that can lead to drinking cessation. It sheds light, and it gives hope.


Getting Help


Alcoholism is certainly serious, but it’s also manageable. People with this condition can get the medical and psychological support they need to change their drinking patterns and their lives, and that work can start right now. By reaching out for care, people with alcoholism can get better.


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